Languages

How to say DRAGON in 50 languages with Europe in a Day!

A common feature in folklore, dragons are found in cultures all over Europe. Generally depicted as monstrous fire-breathing reptiles with large bat-like wings, legends about these ferocious creatures date back as far as the days of the Romans – and they are still a hugely popular part of fantasy literature today!

Whether they are hoarding gold in their underground lairs, scorching the battlefield with their fire or guarding wizard banks, here is how to say dragon in the 50 languages of Europe in a Day!

  1. Albanian – Dragoi
  2. Arabic – تنين (Tanin)
  3. Armenian – Վիշապ (Vishap)
  4. Azerbaijani – Əjdaha
  5. Basque – Herensuge
  6. Belarusian – Цмок (Tsmok)
  7. Bulgarian – Дракон (Drakon)
  8. Catalan – Drac
  9. Croatian – Zmaj
  10. Czech – Drak
  11. Danish – Drage
  12. Dutch – Draak
  13. Estonian – Lohe
  14. Faroese – Dreki
  15. Finnish – Lohikäärme
  16. French – Dragon
  17. Georgian – დრაკონი (Drak’oni)
  18. German – Drache
  19. Greek – Δράκος (Drákos)
  20. Greenlandic – Uumasorujuk
  21. Hungarian – Sárkányok
  22. Icelandic – Dreki
  23. Irish Gaelic – Dragan
  24. Italian – Drago
  25. Jèrriais – Dragon
  26. Latin – Draco
  27. Latvian – Pūķis
  28. Lithuanian – Drakonas
  29. Low German – Draak
  30. Luxembourgish – Draach
  31. Macedonian – Змеј (Zmej)
  32. Maltese – Dragun
  33. Manx – Dragan
  34. Monégasque – Dragun
  35. Northern Sami – Gearpmašat*
  36. Norwegian – Drage
  37. Polish – Smok
  38. Portuguese – Dragão
  39. Romanian – Dragon
  40. Russian – Дракон (Drakon)
  41. Scots Gaelic – Dràgon
  42. Serbian – Змај (Zmaj)
  43. Slovak – Drak
  44. Slovene – Zmaj
  45. Spanish – Dragón
  46. Swedish – Drake
  47. Swiss German – Traach
  48. Turkish – Ejderha
  49. Ukrainian – Дракон (Drakon)
  50. Welsh – Draig
  • Northern Sami – Gearpmašat means ‘serpent’ or ‘snake’

Author: James Scanlan
Banner Image Source: lucascuenca.com

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